Rodney Harrison – NFL Super Bowl Champion

Rodney Harrison is a studio analyst for NBC Sports’  “Football Night in America” and host, Safety Blitz with Rodney Harrison and Dan Schwartzman on NBC Sports Radio. Harrison is a former three-time All-Pro and two-time Super Bowl champion, professional American football player of the National Football League (NFL). Harrison played strong safety for the San Diego Chargers and New England Patriots. He was a two-time Pro Bowl selection and winner of two Super Bowl rings. During his career, Harrison set and still holds the record for sacks by a defensive back, as well as becoming the first NFL player with 30 sacks and 30 interceptions. He also served as a commentator for Sunday Night Football on NBC from 2017-2019.

Harrison played college football at Western Illinois University in Macomb from 1991 to 1993. He is the school’s record-holder for tackles in a career (345) and tackles in a game (28). As a freshman, Harrison was a second-team All-Gateway Football Conference before being named a first-team All-Gateway pick as a sophomore and junior. The Associated Press also named him a second-team All-American as a sophomore and a first-team All-American as a junior.

Harrison was drafted in the fifth round of the 1994 draft, (145th overall) by the San Diego Chargers, the same year they made their only Super Bowl (XXIX) to date, which they lost to the San Francisco 49ers. Harrison became a starting member of the Chargers’ 1996 defense, going to two Pro Bowls with the Chargers in 1998 and 2001. He set then-career highs with the Chargers in 2000 with 127 tackles and six interceptions; in 2002 he started 13 games and recorded 88 tackles in his final season with the Chargers.

Following the 2002 season, on February 27, 2003, Harrison was released by the Chargers. Two weeks later, on March 13, Harrison landed with the Patriots, signing a six-year deal. Harrison then went on to help the New England Patriots win their second title in three years, against the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl XXXVIII, 32–29.

On June 3, 2009, Harrison announced his retirement from football to become an analyst for NBC Sports‘ Football Night in America. Patriots head coach Bill Belichick soon after called Harrison one of the best players he had ever coached.